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RI commercial fishing results revealed

October 27, 2011

NARRAGANSETT — Members of the Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and other local commercial fishermen and marine science researchers gathered Wednesday evening to unveil the results of the Cornell Cooperative Extension Marine Program’s (CCEMP) study, “Rhode Island Commercial Fishing and Seafood Industries-The Development of an Industry Profile.”

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

EG filled with aroma of fresh-baked Swedish sweets

October 26, 2011

EAST GREENWICH — It all started with the closure of a Rumford bakery famous for its Swedish coffee bread.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

EG Town Council holds off taking a stand

October 25, 2011

EAST GREENWICH — With the General Assembly taking its first look at a state pension reform plan Tuesday night, the Town Council decided to hold off on taking a stand.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Fire Prevention Week becomes family affair

October 21, 2011

EAST GREENWICH - National Fire Prevention Week became a family event last week at Stork's Nest Child Academy when Smokey the Bear came to visit preschool classes.

But Smokey, with help from R.I. Department of Environmental Management Senior Forest Ranger David Palumbo, was keeping a little secret from most of the children present.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Locals become 'Occupied' in Providence last weekend

October 21, 2011

EAST GREENWICH — While some in the local media portray Occupy Providence as a movement powered largely by Brown University students and a few disaffected 1960’s radicals, two East Greenwich residents offer opposing evidence.

For Tom Judd, a 2003 East Greenwich High School graduate struggling to establish himself professionally and finding himself unemployed and back home, the group – a local offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street movement which charges banks and large financial firms with triggering the three-year-plus economic downturn – offers the opportunity to work toward a solution.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Final resting place for slaves: ‘God’s Little Acre’

September 16, 2011

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of articles on historical and noteworthy graveyards in Rhode Island.

By KELLY SULLIVAN

Some stories are protected behind centuries-old stone walls. Others, behind iron gates. They may lie shrouded deep within the woods or out in the open, surrounded by fields and farmlands. Many stories inform us of their author, deeply carved into granite or marble. Some offer us nothing more than a fieldstone. And many have no marker of any kind to let us know that the story of a life is rooted in the very ground where we stand. Our cemeteries are often looked upon as merely small expanses of land in which the dead are laid to quiet rest. But their silence speaks a million words, telling stories that achieve a sense of immortality. In this series, we will look at several Rhode Island cemeteries which have amazing stories to tell.
On Farewell Street in Newport stands one of the oldest and largest slave cemeteries in America. Lying within the boundaries of the Common Burying Ground, “God’s Little Acre” is a colonial African burial ground containing nearly 300 graves. Most of the markers are now crude and difficult to read as time has chipped away stone and worn down etchings.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

A beautiful blue sky that rained lives

September 11, 2011

They stood for 30 years, twin symbols of America’s lofty standing and influence in the world, almost 1,400 feet of steel and glass stretching toward Heaven in a marvel of modern engineering. And then in the aftermath of two twin ten-second pulses of released energy, World Trade Center’s Twin Towers were no longer standing. There, and also at the Pentagon building in Washington, D.C., and in a Pennsylvania field on Sept. 11, 2001, 2,976 innocent people were murdered for the simple act of showing up for life that morning.
We can never forget – nor should we – the scenes of how they died that day: Those who were on the planes that had been turned into bombs and were careening toward their horrific destinies. Those on the upper floors of the Twin Towers who were awaiting help that would never come and making heartbreakingly sad last calls on the phones to loved ones. Those who were vaporized in the initial explosions that burned as high as 2,900 degrees Fahrenheit. And those that died in the acts of trying to save those trapped in that living Hell. If the sounds of the grief we felt as a nation that day were compressed into one burst of noise, we’d all fall deaf.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Friday update: Full power restoration inches closer

September 2, 2011

Slowly, the lights are popping back on in East Greenwich.
As of midday Friday, only 305 National Grid customers remain without power in East Greenwich, according to the utility company's website. All but 251 of National Grid's 5,993 local customers lost power as a result of Hurricane Irene's damaging visit to the area on Sunday.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Updates: School pushed back to Tuesday; Summer's End still on

August 31, 2011

The East Greenwich School District's 2011-12 opening has once again been postponed as power outages and other problems created by Hurricane Irene continue to plague the system.
Opening day has now been pushed back to Tuesday, Sept. 6, the third time it has been pushed back a day this week. Kindergarten orientation will also be held that day, with the first day of kindergarten classes now scheduled for Wednesday. Freshman orientation at East Greenwich High School has been postponed indefinitely.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Cleanup continues; school opening delayed

August 30, 2011

(This story has been updated to reflect postponement of school opening to Friday.)

While East Greenwich cleans up after Hurricane Irene and residents slowly regain power, school vacation has been extended yet another day.
School opening has been pushed back a second day to Friday, but as of Tuesday afternoon, several of the town's schools did not have power back, including East Greenwich High School. The School Department's Peirce Street offices were closed and its main 885-3300 number was not operative Tuesday afternoon.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers
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