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September 17th, 2011

South Kingstown's hero comes home

September 17, 2011

After walking over 600 miles from Washington D.C. to Ground Zero, New York City to honor the victims and first responders of September 11, 2001, South Kingstown's Joe "Tiger" Patrick has returned home. His remarkable journey has changed him in more ways than he realized when he set out on foot on Aug. 7.

To celebrate and honor Patrick's achievement, his family, friends, and community turned out at the Elks Lodge #1899 on Belmont Avenue Saturday to show their appreciation.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 16th

Local doctor devotes decades to Haiti

September 17, 2011

By MARTHA SMITH
Special to the Standard

NORTH KINGSTOWN – Dr. Mark Kelley’s dining room table is covered with the haunting images of nearly three years of humanitarian work in Haiti.
There are photographs of starving children who resemble victims of the African famine; others show Kelley, a med student and a nun working over two tiny babies in an Intensive Care Unit set up in a kitchen; still more are of cribs, jammed end to end in a room filled with orphans.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Final resting place for slaves: ‘God’s Little Acre’

September 16, 2011

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of articles on historical and noteworthy graveyards in Rhode Island.

By KELLY SULLIVAN

Some stories are protected behind centuries-old stone walls. Others, behind iron gates. They may lie shrouded deep within the woods or out in the open, surrounded by fields and farmlands. Many stories inform us of their author, deeply carved into granite or marble. Some offer us nothing more than a fieldstone. And many have no marker of any kind to let us know that the story of a life is rooted in the very ground where we stand. Our cemeteries are often looked upon as merely small expanses of land in which the dead are laid to quiet rest. But their silence speaks a million words, telling stories that achieve a sense of immortality. In this series, we will look at several Rhode Island cemeteries which have amazing stories to tell.
On Farewell Street in Newport stands one of the oldest and largest slave cemeteries in America. Lying within the boundaries of the Common Burying Ground, “God’s Little Acre” is a colonial African burial ground containing nearly 300 graves. Most of the markers are now crude and difficult to read as time has chipped away stone and worn down etchings.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 15th

NK voters shoot down McGinn turf installation

September 16, 2011

By PAUL J. SPETRINI
pspetrini@ricentral.com

NORTH KINGSTOWN—In the months leading up to Tuesday’s special election on three bond questions relating to the installation of artificial turf at McGinn Park and the future of the former Wickford Elementary School (WES) building, North Kingstown Town Manager Michael Embury said voters had to approve turf at McGinn because the current condition of the fields in town was an “unacceptable situation” where town employees spent a large number of hours devoted to the field that could devoted elsewhere.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Town Council continues motion to approve $30,000 to fix break room

September 15, 2011

NARRAGANSETT—The Narragansett Town Council continued a motion to approve $29,980 of kitchen improvements to the break room at the town hall. Some town employees, however, have taken umbrage with spending budget dollars on a project which they deem as an unnecessary expenditure.

“Bottom line is that this renovation request is a waste of tax payer's money and is in bad taste during a time of economic hardship,” said one employee. “This break room can be updated for significantly less and still fulfill the needs of Town employees.”

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Dugway Bridge slated for replacement

September 15, 2011

SOUTH KINGSTOWN – The Dugway Bridge will unite West Kingston once more.

The Dugway Bridge in West Kingston closed in January due to ongoing deterioration and with its closing went the ease of passage residents had in getting to their homes and between the north and south sides of the area. West Kingston was left divided. Yet, plans are moving forward to replace the bridge with a similar steel and timber bridge after the town council approved two construction bids at Monday night’s meeting.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

The Times wins 2011 NE Newspaper of the Year

September 15, 2011

Great News! The Narragansett Times has been chosen as the winner of the 2011 New England Newspaper of the Year. Thank you to all our readers who make it all worthwhile.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 14th

Preview this week's Standard Times today!

September 15, 2011

Voters in North Kingstown had their chance Tuesday to tell the town council exactly how they felt about a proposed installation of artificial turf at McGinn Park and, overwhelmingly, they came out against it.
Read all about the special election, as well as about the latest on the Kimberly Fry murder trial, the passing of local icon David Burnham and much, much more in this week's Standard Times!

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Preview today's Narragansett Times

September 14, 2011

In today's The Narragansett Times, find out why the town of Narragansett decided to hire the Woods Hole Group to study beach erosion. Also inside, West Kingston Principal Kim Mather tells how teachers and students survived the start of the first day of school without power. The Times will also inform you on what the town of South Kingstown finally decided to do in regards to the Dugway Bridge in West Kingston. Pick up a copy of today's paper!

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 13th

Curmudgeon's Corner: Schartner ran into an entrenched bureaucracy

September 14, 2011

At its business meeting on August 23rd the North Kingstown School Committee, after a charade of about six weeks, appointed Dr. Phil Auger as superintendent of schools.
The usually irascible and skeptical-of-everything Bill Mudge, who had wanted Dr. Auger made permanent super from the get-go, introduced a motion to anoint–I mean appoint–him as permanent superintendent subject to reaching a mutually acceptable employment contract.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

 

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