Skip to main content

Archive - Sep 2011

September 18th

Tell Me Your Story: Veterans' canteen-style eatery a World War II tribute

September 18, 2011

NORTH KINGSTOWN – All that’s missing at the Quonset Hut Diner is the sound of “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” filling the air.
Otherwise, it is a virtual trip back to a World War II USO-style canteen, with low-cost comfort food cooked up in a 2009 Custom Kitchen trailer by an actual veteran.
Laurie Ludwig, 55 and a native of Staten Island, N.Y., served in the U.S. Air Force after earning a degree in education from Wayne College.
“I wanted to teach,” she explains, “but several thousand teachers were laid off that year.”

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 17th

NK leader Burnham passes on

September 17, 2011

By MARTHA SMITH
Special to the Standard

NORTH KINGSTOWN – David R. Burnham, a Republican political force in town for nearly 20 years, a prominent businessman, contracting industry activist and a farmer with deep roots in 4-H and the Washington County Fair, died Monday after a nine-month battle with cancer.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

South Kingstown's hero comes home

September 17, 2011

After walking over 600 miles from Washington D.C. to Ground Zero, New York City to honor the victims and first responders of September 11, 2001, South Kingstown's Joe "Tiger" Patrick has returned home. His remarkable journey has changed him in more ways than he realized when he set out on foot on Aug. 7.

To celebrate and honor Patrick's achievement, his family, friends, and community turned out at the Elks Lodge #1899 on Belmont Avenue Saturday to show their appreciation.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 16th

Bulldogs take bite out of Chargers

September 17, 2011

WESTERLY — The Chariho football team's league opener was a tough one under the lights at Westerly High School as the Bulldogs, in front of a raucous crowd, took down the Chargers, 16-0, on Friday.

Chariho was held to just 50 total rushing yards on the night against a very physical, very experienced Westerly front seven all game long.

The Chargers also had a pair of fumbles - one in each half - that halted potential scoring drives and turned the momentum over to the rival Bulldogs.

Local doctor devotes decades to Haiti

September 16, 2011

By MARTHA SMITH
Special to the Standard

NORTH KINGSTOWN – Dr. Mark Kelley’s dining room table is covered with the haunting images of nearly three years of humanitarian work in Haiti.
There are photographs of starving children who resemble victims of the African famine; others show Kelley, a med student and a nun working over two tiny babies in an Intensive Care Unit set up in a kitchen; still more are of cribs, jammed end to end in a room filled with orphans.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Final resting place for slaves: ‘God’s Little Acre’

September 16, 2011

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of articles on historical and noteworthy graveyards in Rhode Island.

By KELLY SULLIVAN

Some stories are protected behind centuries-old stone walls. Others, behind iron gates. They may lie shrouded deep within the woods or out in the open, surrounded by fields and farmlands. Many stories inform us of their author, deeply carved into granite or marble. Some offer us nothing more than a fieldstone. And many have no marker of any kind to let us know that the story of a life is rooted in the very ground where we stand. Our cemeteries are often looked upon as merely small expanses of land in which the dead are laid to quiet rest. But their silence speaks a million words, telling stories that achieve a sense of immortality. In this series, we will look at several Rhode Island cemeteries which have amazing stories to tell.
On Farewell Street in Newport stands one of the oldest and largest slave cemeteries in America. Lying within the boundaries of the Common Burying Ground, “God’s Little Acre” is a colonial African burial ground containing nearly 300 graves. Most of the markers are now crude and difficult to read as time has chipped away stone and worn down etchings.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

September 15th

NK voters shoot down McGinn turf installation

September 15, 2011

By PAUL J. SPETRINI
pspetrini@ricentral.com

NORTH KINGSTOWN—In the months leading up to Tuesday’s special election on three bond questions relating to the installation of artificial turf at McGinn Park and the future of the former Wickford Elementary School (WES) building, North Kingstown Town Manager Michael Embury said voters had to approve turf at McGinn because the current condition of the fields in town was an “unacceptable situation” where town employees spent a large number of hours devoted to the field that could devoted elsewhere.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers
Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes