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Archive - Sep 16, 2011

Local doctor devotes decades to Haiti

September 16, 2011

By MARTHA SMITH
Special to the Standard

NORTH KINGSTOWN – Dr. Mark Kelley’s dining room table is covered with the haunting images of nearly three years of humanitarian work in Haiti.
There are photographs of starving children who resemble victims of the African famine; others show Kelley, a med student and a nun working over two tiny babies in an Intensive Care Unit set up in a kitchen; still more are of cribs, jammed end to end in a room filled with orphans.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers

Final resting place for slaves: ‘God’s Little Acre’

September 16, 2011

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of articles on historical and noteworthy graveyards in Rhode Island.

By KELLY SULLIVAN

Some stories are protected behind centuries-old stone walls. Others, behind iron gates. They may lie shrouded deep within the woods or out in the open, surrounded by fields and farmlands. Many stories inform us of their author, deeply carved into granite or marble. Some offer us nothing more than a fieldstone. And many have no marker of any kind to let us know that the story of a life is rooted in the very ground where we stand. Our cemeteries are often looked upon as merely small expanses of land in which the dead are laid to quiet rest. But their silence speaks a million words, telling stories that achieve a sense of immortality. In this series, we will look at several Rhode Island cemeteries which have amazing stories to tell.
On Farewell Street in Newport stands one of the oldest and largest slave cemeteries in America. Lying within the boundaries of the Common Burying Ground, “God’s Little Acre” is a colonial African burial ground containing nearly 300 graves. Most of the markers are now crude and difficult to read as time has chipped away stone and worn down etchings.

Source 
Southern Rhode Island Newspapers
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